Tropics only 2-3 decades from being too hot to live in

HBS Guy

Head Honcho
Staff member
Abstract
Humans’ ability to efficiently shed heat has enabled us to range over every continent, but a wet-bulb temperature (TW) of 35°C marks our upper physiological limit, and much lower values have serious health and productivity impacts. Climate models project the first 35°C TW occurrences by the mid-21st century. However, a comprehensive evaluation of weather station data shows that some coastal subtropical locations have already reported a TW of 35°C and that extreme humid heat overall has more than doubled in frequency since 1979. Recent exceedances of 35°C in global maximum sea surface temperature provide further support for the validity of these dangerously high TW values. We find the most extreme humid heat is highly localized in both space and time and is correspondingly substantially underestimated in reanalysis products. Our findings thus underscore the serious challenge posed by humid heat that is more intense than previously reported and increasingly severe.
https://advances.sciencemag.org/content/6/19/eaaw1838

The whole paper is available at the link above. Worth reading!
 

Squire

Active member
It is foolish to believe that it is only the tropics that will be too hot.

The Northern and Southern temperate climates will also be susceptible due to the long daylight hours in summer.
 

pinkeye

Wonder woman
as a late baby boomer.. :roll :dunno2

not likely to live that long.
Have tried in my own way to help....

Heat ... yes , a noticeable increase in the last 20 years... by me .. not some instrument.

It's a worry.
 

HBS Guy

Head Honcho
Staff member
The tropics are the most humid—hence the important of TW, wet bulb temperature.
 

Texan

Active member
Another 2-3 decades and the tropics might catch up with Houston. They get all the heat and twice the humidity. I don't like going down there in the Summer.
 
Top