An underground home

Texan

Active member
Underground homes typically use lots of concrete. They are expensive, but provide great fire protection. You need to have good ventilation. Carbon monoxide and radon gas are concerns. You also need to be able to shut off ventilation in the event of a forest fire.

A small upper building to house clerestory windows could provide light and promote natural cooling. Make it out of stone or metal for fire resistance.

A rock garden around the perimeter of your home can limit the amount of fuel next to your home. Water sprinklers can help. Be sure to put some on your roof and near doors and windows.
 
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HBS Guy

Head Honcho 💉💉
Staff member
Yes. Best is no vegetation immediately around/on/over the house. The Zonal approach to firescaping is a good way to think of fire resilient homes.
 

Texan

Active member
This concrete dome home survived a fire before it was completed. The couple lost their original home to the fire and moved into the unfinished dome.

 

johnsmith

Moderator
Staff member
This concrete dome home survived a fire before it was completed. The couple lost their original home to the fire and moved into the unfinished dome.


dome homes are very resilient to the elements. Great for cyclone or tornado prone areas.
 

HBS Guy

Head Honcho 💉💉
Staff member
And bushfire prone areas. Bloody expensive tho I bet! Fuck, I could ignore any bushfire preparations!

Started reading on Zones 2 & 3.

My Zone 1 will be vege patch, herb patch, flowers plus succulents closer to the house with 1.5m/5' paths around the house. No seats, arbors or pergolas—all just fuel to the fire.

My Zone 2 will be fruit trees on espalier. I will put my garden shed there—it is a fuel source so keep out of Zone 1. Either right at the back fence or by the start of Zone 2—my greenhouse. Now, I have a road reserve (with road) at the front of my block and an empty road reserve adjoining my right boundary. On the left is another building block—no problem now, just an empty lot but the owner might decide to build a house there some time. Wonder what wonderful paper warfare the council will engage in if and when that happens.

Zone 3 is transition from cultivated to wild.

Living in a potential bushfire area means planning but mainly it means maintenance! Get rid of diseased plant material, tree or weed, it will dry out and so burn. Keep lawn/lawn alternatives mowed short! Irrigate regularly or in dry times, keep your firescaping plants GREEN!

Have to plan my wall for trees prone to frost damage—that can allow me to radically reduce the Zone 1 area!

Decided I want metal fence, metal paling type, a bit like swimming pool fences. Metal don’t burn!
 
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