Cider, Perry and Winemaking

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Cider, Perry and Winemaking

Postby HBS Guy » 23 Mar 2020, 18:03

Cider—from apples

Perry—from pears

Wine—from grapes.

In each case, only certain varieties of apple, pear or grape are used: fruit you grow or buy to eat will make bland, unbalanced beverages. We want fruit that will provide a balance of alcohol, fruitiness, acid and tannins. In cider tannins and pectins provide mouthfeel and body.

While grapes are soft and can be easily pressed apples and pears have to be milled, turned into small pieces called pomace which is then pressed. The pomace is left to “macerate” some time before pressing, longer for pears than apples.

Apples with higher tannins than acids are called bittersweet—they contain a lot of sugar. Well, a lot is relative, a cider usually starts out with an Original Gravity (weight of sugar) of 1050. In a beer that would give about 5% alcohol by volume, in a cider a bit more because it ferments drier. Some apples have more sugar than that and are deceptively strong. Apples with more acid than tannin are called bittersharps, they have some tannins but are more acid. Then there are sweets and dry (aigre, tart) cider apples.

Perries, made from pears tend to be a bit sweeter, having a sugar, sorbitol, that yeast cannot ferment. The four (there is a Longdon perry pear but it is going to take some doing to track it down, but I will) perry pears available in Australia are bittersharps with some difference between the amount of tannins and acidity. Beurre Bosc I will grow as a perry pear, it will add some pear character to the perry. Some of the Green Horse pears I will preserve, doubt any of the other perry pears will be useful for that.

Wine—definitely will want to plant pinot noir, will do well in cool climates, then see if there is space for a couple rows of Reisling and/or semillon.
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Re: Cider, Perry and Winemaking

Postby HBS Guy » 24 Mar 2020, 20:38

Interesting website: https://www.realcider.net/pomonia

Seems some French ciders, the top ones, may be made from the juice of up to 75 varieties of cider apple!

Can’t beat that in my orchard but I do have a mis:

bittersweet
bittersharp
Sharp
Sweet

Some apples like Bramley’s Seedling are good for cooking but a LOT go into cider, adding tartness I guess.

As well as the cider apples I have some aromatic dessert apples to add apple character to a cider.

Fuck I hope I can travel to Tassie late Sep, don’t want to have to wait until April next year!

Will make some straight ciders for a while: Dabinet, Brown Snout, Yarlington Mill, King David etc. Do that the first year then the same the year after but try some blending.

Shit, the more I read about Brown Snout the better it looks! Some apples might be better as juice than cider! Some are just blenders, lovely experiments to do! Hmmm Dabinet nice but too bitter, add 25% Golden Harvey? Sip, hmmm NO! LOL!
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Re: Cider, Perry and Winemaking

Postby DonDeeHippy » 25 Mar 2020, 05:28

HBS Guy wrote:Interesting website: https://www.realcider.net/pomonia

Seems some French ciders, the top ones, may be made from the juice of up to 75 varieties of cider apple!

Can’t beat that in my orchard but I do have a mis:

bittersweet
bittersharp
Sharp
Sweet

Some apples like Bramley’s Seedling are good for cooking but a LOT go into cider, adding tartness I guess.

As well as the cider apples I have some aromatic dessert apples to add apple character to a cider.

Fuck I hope I can travel to Tassie late Sep, don’t want to have to wait until April next year!

Will make some straight ciders for a while: Dabinet, Brown Snout, Yarlington Mill, King David etc. Do that the first year then the same the year after but try some blending.

Shit, the more I read about Brown Snout the better it looks! Some apples might be better as juice than cider! Some are just blenders, lovely experiments to do! Hmmm Dabinet nice but too bitter, add 25% Golden Harvey? Sip, hmmm NO! LOL!

you might have to charter a plane and parachute in at night Monk :rofl
Bongalong... for some reason women are just so superior to anything that ever existed or will ever exist!
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Re: Cider, Perry and Winemaking

Postby HBS Guy » 25 Mar 2020, 06:53

That is an idea!

I can go in April 2021 but want to go Sep-Oct! THREE weeks respite! Hallelujah!
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Re: Cider, Perry and Winemaking

Postby HBS Guy » 25 Mar 2020, 11:57

This is a nice apple:

Cornish Aromatic is a high-quality late-season dessert apple from Cornwall, with an attractive red / russeted skin.

In a good year the flavour can be excellent - a rich pear-drop note to the firm flesh.


Aromatic, nice small addition to a cider crush. Nice to eat too! And juice right well too I’d say!


Ummm I did boast I could grow any apple on my 850chill hour block. Uh uh, there is a cider apple needs 2500 chill hours!
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Re: Cider, Perry and Winemaking

Postby HBS Guy » 29 Mar 2020, 15:04

Just told sis that if I can’t go to Tas in Sep I want 10 days respite then. That should spoil her Sunday, ha!
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