What Beer Do You Like?

SethBullock

Moderator
Staff member
Drank a can of Rogue chocolate stout. Forgettable.

BUT

I have a bottle of Deschute’s “Black Butte” and am keen to try that tomorrow.
I like Black Butte, but I have tasted others whose flavor is more memorable, like Guiness for example. What did you think?
 

HBS Guy

Head Honcho
Staff member
The Guinness we get here is a bit stale, i think. No, I prefer the Black Butte.

Hah, Guinness is like 3.5%abv, OG1035. Made up a Pack, 3Kg crushed pale malt, 500g roast barley—my part mash customers could brew this as a full mash beer (the roast barley had to be cold steeped, a 3Kg part mash was all I could be bothered making Packs for—what is the point of a 1Kg part mash then drowned in malt extract? A 3Kg part mash with 1.5Kg Coopers light liquid malt extract (always fresh, sold quite quickly) has 67% of fermentable sugars from real malt, worth doing. To get a strong beer—add less water, 18L I think for the Christmas Ale Pack another beer was topped up to only 15L to get a high starting gravity, high alcohol.

What I will do in Tassie I think is two small mashes of 2-3.5Kg of grain, add them to the fermenter, get a reasonable beer of 4–7%abv out of it. When feeling good, no twinges—do a decent mash of 10-15Kg of grain, make 1 batch of really strong beer or one 20L batch strong beer and 2 x 20L batches of a less strong beer (say 20L 10% beer, 40L of 5% beer—drink the 5% beer letting the 10% beer age nicely.)

LOVE to make another batch of Russian Imperial Stout, get it to 12% with grain, add a 2Kg bucket blue gum honey at flameout, the hot hot wort dissolves the honey no probs: means the FG is 1033 noit 1053, a year in a keg in the cellar (under the house in Tassie) sees the 1033 drop down to 1019. Bottle without priming but maybe a bit of fresh yeast—nice carbonation in the bottles. My last batch I took the last 2 stubbies of it to Queensland (staying with Left of Centre) and they were eight years old. Unfortunately, no taste left. No off taste, just no real taste left.

I want to make 1-2 batches of my lovely Golden Ale, all Maris Otter premium pale malt, all Goldings hops, work out the recipe, add 1Kg mlore Maris Otter—lovely thick last runnings, pure malt, no off tastes. One malt one hop—a depth of flavor more complex recipes cannot touch.

And another batch or two of a real IPA: OG >1060, 300g of Goldings or Fuggles hop flowers, like the RIS, stow it in a keg under the house for a year. A flavor of fresh hops and hops turned to flavonoids. Idiots today try to make a “real, authentic” IPA balancing malt and hops. No, an IPA is ALL about hops, bittering and that balance between hop bitterness and hop-based flavonoids.

I do enjoy drinking most IPAs/APAs—decently bitter, pale ale, lovely citrusy hops. They just are not authentic IPAs. The real, original IPA was brewed, fermented, transported to the docks and just before being loaded onto an Indiaman a cup of sugar was added to each barrel “to give the yeast something to do.” If the barrels weren’t filled 100% full—if a tiny airbubble existed the CO2 from the action of the yeast would accumulate in that buuble and Boyles Law saw the pressure in the bubble increase until it burst the barrel!

Not too many burst barrel on the docks at Goa but, despite the heroic amount of hops, too many barrels we were found to be spoiled and the beer emptied into the harbor. This was 40-50 years pre-pasteur.


The US Civil War was the last big war to be fought pre-pasteur. The solution to too many wounds was—amputation to stop gangrene.

I love history—technology never marches quicker than during a war.
 

SethBullock

Moderator
Staff member
@HBS Guy I'm glad you liked the Black Butte. It does have a nice roastiness!

What you said about war is true, and medical advances are definitely one of those things. People these days who suffer traumatic injuries are having their lives saved by procedures learned on the battlefields of Iraq and Afghanistan.
 

HBS Guy

Head Honcho
Staff member
Yes. Photography had been invented by the Civil War—photos were taken of all the major wounds suffered which sounds a bit off but advanced surgical training immensely.
 

SethBullock

Moderator
Staff member
pFriem is a small craft brewery in Hood River, OR. They make really excellent beers. I just finished this bottle of Hazy IPA. Notes of fruit- grapefruit, strawberry, mango, and papaya.

7.9%

B22DAA33-23EB-4DBD-8749-83323DAB3B66.jpeg
 

HBS Guy

Head Honcho
Staff member
Gorgeous looking beer, sound yummy!

Nothing much to report, a Fresh Squeezed IPA from Deschutes.

I also have their Old Fashioned, a stout aged in bourbon barrels for 12 months, report on that in a few days.
 

SethBullock

Moderator
Staff member
Gorgeous looking beer, sound yummy!

Nothing much to report, a Fresh Squeezed IPA from Deschutes.

I also have their Old Fashioned, a stout aged in bourbon barrels for 12 months, report on that in a few days.
It was a gorgeous beer and very, very good. I still think it absolutely sucks that I can't just send beer to you guys. If I could, you'd be drinking that pFriem too.

I hope you enjoy the Fresh Squeezed.

I tried a bourbon barrel aged ale a while ago and didn't like it. The barrel transferred the taste of whiskey to the beer, and I'm not a whiskey drinker. I know that is sacrilege to say, but I've never really cared for it. Let me know how you like it, though.
 

HBS Guy

Head Honcho
Staff member
The problem with sending beer is the US Post. Our customs/postal service are happy to carry beer, yours won’t so I can’t send you a Coopers Sparkling Ale or a stubby of my homebrew to you but I can to Don for example.
 

SethBullock

Moderator
Staff member
The problem with sending beer is the US Post. Our customs/postal service are happy to carry beer, yours won’t so I can’t send you a Coopers Sparkling Ale or a stubby of my homebrew to you but I can to Don for example.
It's freakin un-American, I tell ya.
 

HBS Guy

Head Honcho
Staff member
Will upload the photo in a minute.

Deschutes Old Fashioned, matured 12 months in a bourbon barrel.

The beer pours a nice light amber color, not too much froth and the head is down to 2-3mm foam.

Smell, malt with a sharp note of hops and something else.

Taste, malt balanced by the hops, slight aniseed flavor—some roasted malt in the grist. Then there is something that must be the bourbon or oak, not too obvious. Some people really hate beer aged in bourbon barrels, it is OK. I will age wine, beer, cider etc in 20–30L oak barrels.

The beer is rather cold (34°C here today, will let the remainder warm up—cold masks a lot of flavor (with crap beer like VB extreme cold masks the lack of flavor!
 

SethBullock

Moderator
Staff member
There is orange peel in the beer. Never noticed it.
It looks good! I'm a little gun shy now on beers aged in bourbon barrels because, like I said, I don't care for whiskey. I've never seen that beer in the store, but I'll watch for it. Not surprised about the orange peel flavor. Deshutes seems to like adding a note of fruit to some of their beers. That pFriem I drank the other day had nice fruit notes as well.

The Deschutes Fresh Haze is one that has that orange note to it.
 
Top