Record warm Arctic

HBS Guy

Head Honcho
Staff member
  • Sea level has risen 8–9 inches (21–24 centimeters) since 1880.
  • In 2019, global sea level was 3.4 inches (87.61 mm) above the 1993 average—the highest annual average in the satellite record (1993-present)
It's crap like that, that shits me, how could they possibly know sea levels in 1880 when they have only been able to accurately measure since 1993... this is the reason why these sites are so easily picked apart.....
One lie and the whole piece is suss...


Mr monk is quoting one-eighth of a inch rise every decade (3mm)... which one is right ?
1/8" = 0.125" = 0.3175cm = 3.175mm

16 years x .3175mm/yr ≈ 50mm not 87.61mm

Tide gauge records go back a long way:

https://www.climate.gov/news-features/climate-tech/reading-between-tides-200-years-measuring-global-sea-level#:~:text=It%20wasn't%20until%201851,on%20a%20rotating%20paper%20drum.
 

DonDeeHippy

Active member
well if your using tide gauge records then use them... what have the tide gauge makers reported since 1993, are they the same as the satellite...
Mr monk you said before there was only a 3mm raise every decade, was that wrong ?
 

HBS Guy

Head Honcho
Staff member
Satellites and tide gauges measure slightly different things:

1. A satellite measures the absolute difference in distance between the satellite and surface of the sea

2. Tide gauges measure the relative movement of the sea with respect to the land: land can be stable, sinking (E coast of the US is sinking as part of the isostatic rebound from the disappearance of the Laurentide ice sheets) or rising.
 

DonDeeHippy

Active member
The qualification doesn't matter: the rate of change of an exponential curve is itself exponential 🤾
adjective
of or relating to an exponent or exponents.
Mathematics.
  1. of or relating to the constant e.
  2. (of an equation) having one or more unknown variables in one or more exponents.
rising or expanding at a steady and usually rapid rate:a city experiencing exponential growth.
noun
Mathematics.
  1. the constant e raised to the power equal to a given expression, as e3x, which is the exponential of 3x.
  2. any positive constant raised to a power.


I don't think it means what you think it does.....
 

MilesAway

Bongalong
adjective
of or relating to an exponent or exponents.
Mathematics.
  1. of or relating to the constant e.
  2. (of an equation) having one or more unknown variables in one or more exponents.
rising or expanding at a steady and usually rapid rate:a city experiencing exponential growth.
noun
Mathematics.
  1. the constant e raised to the power equal to a given expression, as e3x, which is the exponential of 3x.
  2. any positive constant raised to a power.


I don't think it means what you think it does.....
😂
 

MilesAway

Bongalong
This is interesting: it shows how not only the ultimate bad thing hasn't happened in the Arctic yet (that being, as defined by the IPCC, 5 years in a row of less than 1 M square kilometres) but more that due to the very inconsistent pattern of consecutive lowish years must actually be a very long way off indeed.

(This is a very good thing of course because that scenario would change the world permanently. There is no way it would happen before 2100, if ever.)

 

MilesAway

Bongalong
Whoah, hard to interpret: strange graph really put together by Born From The Void over at Nevens Sea Ice Forum; pg 3 - "Freezing season 2020..." Thread.

The moderator picked up that the numbers seemed strange... BFTV realised he made a mistake and uploaded this recorrected graph.

To give him credit tho he did do it at the request of someone else so atleast he is a solid contributor. 🤾🏌🏌🏌🏌🏌🏌🏌🏌🏌
 

MilesAway

Bongalong
It basically just shows a battle for homeostasis and funnily enough my initial
comments still basically stand.

This cacophony of errors on my behalf makes you realise the IPCCs logic of needing 5 consecutive years of very bad data before issuing the warning to all stations... IMHO anyway!
 

HBS Guy

Head Honcho
Staff member
Still bloody warm, with not much freezing yet in the Arctic—Siberia to blame, again.
 
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HBS Guy

Head Honcho
Staff member
The CAA has opened up, the thick ice in it melted, another way for Arctic ice to move south and out the Arctic.
 
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